?

Log in

No account? Create an account
15 October 2007 @ 09:06 pm
This lesson covers the particles は* wa (used to mark the topic of the sentence) and が ga (used to mark the neutral subject of a sentence) and the Subject-Object-Verb format of Japanese sentences.

ed. note: sorry for the lag in updating this working e-book with more lessons. College studies demanded attention and the lessons ahead needed some thought-gathering!


Lesson Six: Wa and Ga, the Subject MarkersCollapse )

Remember to study your kana (hiragana and katakana) for a few minutes every day if possible. They are your most important skill and can be used in place of kanji for most of your vocabulary at this point. 勉強!
 
 
 
 
 
19 August 2007 @ 06:11 pm
This lesson covers occupations such as student or artist and nationalities, such as Japanese. It also includes common phrases used when talking about occupations and nationalities. They are together in this lesson because of the frequent need to know where a person comes from and what they do.


Lesson Five: Occupations, Nationalities, Yes and No and Common PhrasesCollapse )

Remember to study your kana (hiragana and katakana) for a few minutes every day if possible. They are your most important skill and can be used in place of kanji for most of your vocabulary at this point. 勉強!
 
 
 
19 August 2007 @ 02:10 am
Grammatically speaking, Japanese pronouns function just as English pronouns do; Japanese pronouns are in most respects the same as other nouns and therefore the same rules are applied to them as all other Japanese nouns-- they can be modified. While pronouns are essential to English-speakers, peppering your conversations with them in Japanese will lead to a formal and probably unwanted tone to your side of the conversation, so it's best to use them as sparingly as possible.

Lesson Four: Japanese PronounsCollapse )

Remember to study your kana (hiragana and katakana) for a few minutes every day if possible. They are your most important skill and can be used in place of kanji for most of your vocabulary at this point. 勉強!
Tags:
 
 
19 August 2007 @ 01:49 am
Lesson Three: Greetings and Common PhrasesCollapse )

Remember to study your kana (hiragana and katakana) for a few minutes every day if possible. They are your most important skill and can be used in place of kanji for most of your vocabulary at this point. 勉強!
 
 
 
18 August 2007 @ 10:22 pm
This lesson will include colors as both adjectives and nouns, how to form some colors, the cardinal directions and common shapes. It may seem to the reader like they have gone back to kindergarten for the moment; this is why these subjects have been chosen for a single lesson.


Lesson Two: Colors, Cardinal Directions, ShapesCollapse )

Remember to study your kana (hiragana and katakana) for a few minutes every day if possible. They are your most important skill and can be used in place of kanji for most of your vocabulary at this point. 勉強!
 
 
18 August 2007 @ 08:15 pm
This lesson will be on counting simple numbers (but no math yet) and days and months. This lesson is grouped this way because counting is important in Japanese months, as they are listed one through twelve. The days of the week and four seasons are included because they go along well with the other subject matter.

Lesson One: Counting, Four Seasons, Days and MonthsCollapse )

Remember to study your kana (hiragana and katakana) for a few minutes every day if possible. They are your most important skill and can be used in place of kanji for most of your vocabulary at this point. 勉強!